Projects

Our projects surround the use and design of disaster information.

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The Himalayan Climate Data Field Lab is a month-long, flexible unconference that will gather scholars, practitioners, activists, community leaders, and storytellers to examine the ways that climate change data and information infrastructures shape adaptation and mitigation in the Himalayan region. Join the Field Lab to co-design, test and produce new ideas, analytic tools, maps, sensing technologies, data protocols, artistic pieces and communication products that address climate change and its impacts, with the aim of creating a more equitable and pluralistic data landscape in the Himalayan region.

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Apil K C

PhD Researcher

Who responds (and does not respond) to crowdsourced shaking intensity data, Did You Feel It?

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Elijah Knodel

Undergraduate Researcher

In a collaboration between the USGS and the Natural Hazards Center at CU Boulder, we take a human-centered design approach to co-design the update of USGS earthquake impact products to be more actionable and accessible.

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Sabine Loos

Assistant Professor

From remote sensing to crowdsourcing, an overwhelming amount of building damage data is produced after disasters. While this amount of data signifies impressive technological progress, it does not necessarily mean that all building damage data is usable for post-earthquake decision-making. This research applies geostatistical methods to integrate multiple sources of data to produce rapid estimates of building damage, primarily to support regional decision making.

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Sabine Loos

Assistant Professor

Informatics for Equitable Recovery is a transdisciplinary research collaboration that brings together data scientists, engineers, social scientists, and civic organizations to improve post-disaster information systems and decision support tools.

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Sabine Loos

Assistant Professor

As a collaboration between the Stanford Urban Resilience Inititative, Heidelberg University, The World Bank, and Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, this project compares three approaches to crowdsourcing building damage data using satellite imagery to inform disaster response decisions.

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Sabine Loos

Assistant Professor